Scott Nicolay

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Tag: necronomicon providence (page 3 of 3)

Daniel Mills: When Things Were Rotten, a Weird Historicity | The Outer Dark: Episode 11 — SEPTEMBER 16, 2015

tlcat_newDaniel Mills, author of the 2014 critically acclaimed collection The Lord Came at Twilight, discusses how his writing engages with historical voices such as Hawthorne, Chambers and others, rediscovering obscure authors of the 19th and 20th centuries who delved into weird, ghosts and the supernatural, the tendency among contemporary weird writers to be archivists/archaeologists digging into old sources for forgotten gems, his wistful yearning for past eras such as Colonial America versus confronting the spiritual corruption of American history in his stories, presenting a mannered lyrical approach to storytelling in a fresh and contemporary application, the artistry of depicting grotesque material with beautiful prose, modern cinematic writing versus language itself as “a world where you can disappear,” narrative restraint and the horror that happens offstage, courtships that reflect the intersection of deeply repressed desires and warped worldviews, clerical characters and the contradictions of America’s Christian mythos, creative misremembering, balancing presentism and historicism, discovering a shared New England sensibility with Matthew Bartlett, NecronomiCon Providence and the excitement and critical mass of today’s Weird Renaissance, the resounding influence of John Bellairs, upcoming projects including short stories, a novella and a second novel inspired by the spiritualism and theosophy movements of the late 19th century, and his current recommended reading including Reggie Oliver and Orrin Grey

This archival episode will be available again at This Is Horror soon. In the meantime, subscribe at iTunes  or Blubrry to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

More Links:

www.daniel-mills.net/

“Brickett Bottom” by Amyas Northcote: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0606161h.html#s2

Next Week’s Guest: Niels Hobbs, Director of NecronomiCon Providence.

s.j. bagley and Simon Strantzas: Thinking Horror in the 21st Century, Before and Beyond| The Outer Dark: Episode 10 — SEPTEMBER 8, 2015

thkhrrrs.j. bagley and Simon Strantzas converse about collaborating on their new Thinking Horror journal premiering in October, why it’s important now to have a journal that focuses on the philosophy and criticism of horror, the theme of the first issue “Horror in the 21st Century,” addressing the problematic nature of how the term “horror” is viewed by mainstream movie/reading audiences versus writers, the curse and boon of the horror boom of the 1980s and 1990s, the transgressive possibilities of horror, an ever-wider, ever-deepening field of diverse writers and content, the importance of recovering older weird writers to seeding the Weird Renaissance and the importance of the Weird in horror now, Weird horror as a mode to reconcile the self with an ever-expanding world and the relationship between contemporary Weird fiction and modernism, Asian and African influences on horror and Weird fiction, understanding the different facets through which specific writers see horror, upcoming issue themes, the importance of affordable reprint editions, the future of horror, their reading recommendations including Steven Millhauser, Kristi DeMeester, Michael Wehunt,Daniel Mills, Helen Marshall, and Jeffrey Thomas, and when and where readers can get copies of Thinking Horror (paperback and eBook).

This archival episode will be available again at This Is Horror soon. In the meantime, subscribe at iTunes  or Blubrry to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

More Links:

www.thinkinghorror.net

www.valancourtbooks.com

NEXT WEEK’S GUEST: Daniel Mills, author of The Lord Came at Twilight

Jayaprakash Satyamurthy: Follow the Bangalorey Man | The Outer Dark: Episode 2 — JUNE 30, 2015

js-wtofabThis week author Jayaprakash Satyamurthy discusses his debut collection Weird Tales of a Bangalorean and the Bangalore Mythos he created from the mysterious city behind it, the unstable nature of our reality, his upcoming second collection A Volume of Sleep and how it differs from its predecessor, his work with animal welfare and the significance of animal consciousness (some cats and dogs contribute to the interview), the essential role of music in his writing, and several writers who deserve a wider reputation outside India.

This archival episode will be available again at This Is Horror soon. In the meantime, subscribe at iTunes  or Blubrry to make sure you don’t miss an episode.

Stories Available Online:

Vyvyan’s Father (Lovecraft eZine, Dec. 2013)

The Ouroboros Apocrypha (Lovecraft eZine, April 2012)

Additional Links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naiyer_Masud

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vilas_Sarang

http://pratilipi.in/2011/11/bharath’s-toys-suresh-subramanian/

NEXT WEEK’S GUEST: S.P. Miskowski, author of Knock, Knock and the Skillute Cycle.

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